Homeowners associations often get a lot of bad press. This may not be fair, but if you are in a dispute with your HOA in Florida, you may have a lot of negative things to say yourself. Arguing with the HOA makes for a hostile living environment. It can make enjoying your home difficult until you reach a resolution.

It is important that during a dispute with your HOA, you make sure to always take the higher ground and make good decisions so that after this property dispute is over, you do not have lasting negative effects. U.S. News and World Report explains that approaching the situation with an HOA in a businesslike manner can make a world of difference. Here are three tips to help you do that.

  1. Ask for clarification

It is wise to seek clarification on any written notice you get, particularly if it is unclear. Have a meeting face to face with the board so you can ask questions and get evidence to support the claim. This also gives you an opportunity to have your voice heard.

  1. Make sure you understand the rules

Know your HOA rules. You should not argue over something that is a clear violation. After all, you agreed to the rules when you moved in or when the community adopted the HOA, so you have to follow them. A thorough understanding of your HOA rules will help you avoid conflict with your neighbors and give you confidence in the decisions you make about your property.

  1. Be willing to compromise

The chances are that if you are breaking a rule, or even stretching one, you will not get to have things your way in the end. So, offer a compromise. Be willing to negotiate and give a little.

Dealing with your HOA does not have to be an all-out war. In fact, it should not be. The association wields significant power over you and your property, so it is wise to make an effort to get along and maintain a peaceful relationship.

Sometimes disputes are inevitable when an HOA refuses to compromise or violates its own rules. If you have questions about your rights in a disagreement with an HOA, it is wise to speak with a lawyer. A knowledgeable real estate attorney can advise you of your rights and advocate for your interests.